Discovering tea

The life of tea

To live tea as a moment between brackets, to gather for it and around it, to be passionate about the search for the innumerable variety of gustatory notes, to discover the periods of overtaste, to savour the new flavoured creations, to know the terroirs…

The producing countries

The Island of Ceylon – Ceylon black tea

In 1972, the island of Ceylon took the name of Sri Lanka, but this name, which dates back to the British Empire, has remained in use in the world of tea and it is common to speak of a Ceylon to designate a tea from this country.
The third largest producer in the world, Sri Lanka, nicknamed the island of tea, supplies more than half of the black teas consumed in France.

Ceylon, a magnificent island, a magical name, where everyone knows there is tea… but many are unaware of the great diversity of teas produced, with a wide range of flavours.

Ceylon is the only country where tea is harvested all year round.

India – Indian black tea

India is the largest producer of tea and accounts for almost a third of the world’s production.

Teas from India are very different from each other. On the one hand, because from one region to another, the climatic conditions and the relief are very different: mountainous regions, plateaus, plains, and on the other hand, because the plantations are not all made up of the same types of tea bushes

 

 

Japan – Green tea from Japan

Japan produces green tea exclusively using a very industrial process that differs from the Chinese pot method, as the leaves are steamed and then dried.

The main families of teas are classified essentially according to their method of cultivation, according to the exposure of the tea bushes to the sun, before plucking.

The teas are all classified according to their production method, i.e. whether they were grown in full sun, which is the Sencha method, or whether they were covered before harvesting, which is the Gyokuro method.

 

China – Green tea from China

The varieties of tea from China are almost endless!

Traditionally, Chinese teas are named after the shape of the tea leaves used: Chun Mee tea, for example, means “old man’s eyebrow”. The best known Chinese variety is gunpowder tea, which has become popular thanks to the famous mint tea.

The main families of teas are classified essentially according to their method of cultivation, according to the exposure of the tea bushes to the sun, before plucking.

The teas are all classified according to their production method, i.e. whether they were grown in full sun, which is the Sencha method, or whether they were covered before harvesting, which is the Gyokuro method.

China – Black tea from China

The cradle of tea and the world’s leading producer until the 19th century, China is now second only to India in terms of production.

Not only are there more tea gardens in China than there are wines in France, but all tea families are represented.

 

Tea grades

Find below the classification of black tea.
Regarding green teas, the names of the different forms of green tea vary according to the country of production, the national or even regional names and the manufacturing methods.
This is because the green tea producing countries have never been subject to English influence. They therefore do not follow the classification known in other countries.

Les thés à grandes feuilles
O.P.Orange Pekoe : 20 à 30 mm
F.O.P.Flowery Orange Pekoe : entre 8 et 15 mm
G.F.O.P.Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe
T.G.F.O.P.Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe
F.T.G.F.O.P.Finest Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe
F.T.G.F.O.P.1Finest Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe One
S.F.T.G.F.O.P.Special Finest Tippy Golden Flowery Orange Pekoe
PPekoe
P.S.Pekoe Souchong
SSouchong
Les thés à petites feuilles
B.O.P.Broken Orange Pekoe : 1.5mm à 2mm
F.B.O.P.Flowery Broken Orange Pekoe
G.B.O.P.Golden Broken Orange Pekoe
G.F.B.O.P.Golden Flowery Broken Orange Pekoe
T.G.B.O.P.Tippy Golden Broken Orange Pekoe
B.P.S.Broken Pekoe Souchong

The preparation of tea

MEASURING TEA

This is a difficult question to answer, as the capacity of cups and teapots varies. On average, we recommend using one heaping teaspoon (2g) for a cup of about 25/30cl.

TEMPERATURE & BREWING TIME

Our teas and infusions require quality water. Ideally, spring water or filtered water

Thés noirs95°CGrandes feuilles3 à 5 min
Petites feuilles3 à 4 min
Aromatisés4 à 5 min
Thés verts75°CNatures3 min
Aromatisés
Thés semi-fermentés ou Oolong95°CNatures5 min
Aromatisés
Thés blancs70°CNaturesDe 7 à 15 min
Aromatisés
Rooibos95°CNatures5 min
Aromatisés
Thés blends90°CNatures4 min
Aromatisés
Infusions95°CPlantes5 min
Fruits
Fruits & Plantes
Thés glacés5°CA froidDe 2 à 6h
75°C - 95°CA chaudDe 5 à 10 min

It is undoubtedly important to find the time to indulge yourself and enjoy all the aromas that come out of your cup. For iced tea, we recommend a cold infusion of between 1 and 4 hours, depending on your preferences.

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